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Real Training, Real Athletes, UNREAL RESULTS!

At NLA, youth sports is about these things. Being Self Aware, Cultivating Skill and Talent, Being Proficient, Learning To Be Masterful At A Craft, Finding Out How Good You Really Are, HAVING FUN!

 

GREATNESS Is Possible Here

 

NLA Is The Youth Training Headquarters in Katy, TX!

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WELCOME TO NEXT LEVEL ATHLETICS!

 

Your TALENT Is GOD's Gift To You. What You Do With Your TALENT Is Your Gift Back To GOD!

 

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Coach Rey and his NFL Staff are FBU Top Gun Scouts!

Our facility is located conveniently in the Katy/Cinco Ranch area.

Our BRAND NEW STATE OF THE ART COMPLEX IS OPEN!

 

25311 Kingsland Blvd

Suite 120

Call: (832)272-0827 or (832) 437-9629

Email: coachrey@nlainc.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WELCOME TO TOTAL FITNESS TRAINING!

 

 

Our staff has been serving the Katy area for 16 years and have had tremendous success in training both athletes and adults. We have been blessed to put together one of the finest fitness teams in the Houston area. You will not find a better team of certified and college educated trainers in the Houston area. Our trainers either carry degrees in Exercise Science , are certified through nationally accredited strength and conditioning associations or a combination of the two.

 

We take great pride in providing the Katy and surrounding communities with the highest level of customer service. we have trained thousands of athletes and adults, ranging from ages 7 to 65+ years old. 

 

With 31 years experience in the Fitness Industry gives us insight to some of the most advanced science available to date. You will find safe, challenging, practical & proven sessions that leave you a feeling of accomplishment with every session. 

 

Our TOTAL FITNESS TRAINING is comprised of three distinct phases:

PHASE I - FITNESS (Beginner)

PHASE II - THE NLA BOX (Advanced)

PHASE III - FUNCTIONAL PATTERNS (Elite)

 

 

Sign up today for THE BEST FITNESS PROGRAM IN KATY TX!

Please click on Fitness, THE NLA BOX or FUNCTIONAL PATTERNS tab to learn more.

It's Hard To Beat A Person Who Never Gives Up!

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Real Pros, Real Training, UNREAL RESULTS!

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Coach's Corner


7 SPEED TRAINING MISTAKES THAT KEEP ATHLETES SLOW
Aug 2, 2015, 4:29 pm

 

 

With the click of a mouse, athletes have an arsenal of speed training videos drills and techniques to improve their athleticism at their fingertips.  As great as this is for the modern athlete, it is also loaded with potential tripwires that can plateau an athlete’s speed development as fast as they can build it.

In all my years of coaching and training, I’ve seen a number of mistakes that athletes make when they get  tunnel vision and think a specific drill or exercise will make them faster on the field and catch them up to their peers.  Becoming the fastest athlete that one can be is a holistic venture, which revolves around a speed training program that emphasizes the right mechanics, the special strength work to bolster those mechanics, and the strength work that improves the size and coordination of the specific muscle involved. Choosing the correct training regimen is important, but how you perform that training regimen is also a critical issue in getting faster.

Over time, I’ve found seven glaring mistakes that aspiring athletes tend to make when pursuing the task of increasing their speed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOT DOING ENOUGH ACTUAL SPRINT OR SPECIFIC SPEED PRACTICE

Athletes often forget that to get faster, the most important thing that you can do is to practice the sprinting you’ll be performing in competition.  Slow athletes will become the kings and queens of drill work, but when it comes time to drop the hammer in an actual footrace, they are left behind.

Drills don’t make you fast; specific speed work does.  Sprint drills as we know them were largely invented to help with the special strength conditioning of the muscles of athletes who trained in cold weather regions and didn’t have good indoor facilities.  To get fast, you must practice the specific type of speed you wish to improve with strong focus and intention.

If you are a basketball or football player, this means that there is a priority on things like 20m dash time, or specific, timed change of direction work.  You get faster at running 20s by actually sprinting 20s all out with good recovery in between each sprint.  If you are a track and field athlete, you get faster primarily by practicing maximal efforts at your specific race distance.  I’ve seen plenty of athletes who can rock sprint drills with great rhythm and coordination, and then get blown away when it comes to actually sprinting.  Looking cool because you can do the fancy C-skip doesn’t look as cool anymore when you are the last one to cross the finish line in the actual race!

NOT SPRINTING FAST ENOUGH WHEN YOU PRACTICE

Many athletes forget that speed training is not a casual venture.  Simply performing a sprint, plyometric, or drill will not in and of itself make one faster.  Sprinting fast makes one faster.  By timing a sprint, three great things happen:

  1. The athlete gets immediate feedback as to the quality of their attempt, which helps them to both consciously and subconsciously formulate a method of improving their performance.
  2. Having an outcome goal preset will improve the level of performance.  External goals give the subconscious mind a clearer view of what is trying to be accomplished.
  3. Giving immediate feedback on a specific sprint attempt is a very important method of teaching athletes to deal with the results of their performance, whether good or bad.  Some athletes struggle with fear of their results, which leads them down the drill route, but they must learn to always come back to the most important thing, which is solid, timed, specific efforts.

Some coaches will even tell you that unless you are timing your sprints, then you aren’t really training speed.  Put a stopwatch or timing system on your next speed training session, and you will feel the difference in both the mental approach and your body’s response.  Compare this to strength training: Speed training with no timed goal would be similar to lifting weights without ever noting how much weight was on the bar.

NOT COMPETING ENOUGH DURING SPEED PRACTICE

Along with timing speed training efforts, athletes need to compete in the pursuit of maximal velocity.  Many athletes who are less fleet of foot than their peers will generate a fear of competition, and gravitate toward drills and exercises that they can perform on their own to make themselves faster.  This mentality will cripple the speed development of any athlete.  Not only does competition offer an athlete an adrenaline boost, increasing their speed output, but it also helps athletes to overcome fear of outcomes, which improves not only speed, but is a valuable mental athletic skill.

Compete with others to build your sprint engine or you’ll get left behind.

DOING TOO MUCH EXTRA WORK ON TOP OF SPORT PRACTICE

An athlete’s ability to recover from training is finite.  We cannot train 10 hours a day and expect to recover, and this is a pretty obvious statement.  What about five hours a day?  Two?

Speed training – real maximal speed training – is a taxing venture.  Elite track coaches will generally recommend at least 48 hours of recovery after a maximal speed training session, sometimes more.  If you are competing in a sport and playing several times each week, then sport play itself is already providing you a potent speed stimulus.  Doing lots of extra plyometrics and drills on top of lots of sports play is often counterproductive.

So how do you know if you are in a good state to train speed?  By timing your efforts and not performing low-quality work.

If an athlete had five sport practices in a week and wanted to get extra speed work in on the weekend, but then noticed his performance was much worse than in the past, is the extra work helping him?  The short answer is no.

The long answer is that athletes need to be aware of the volume present in replicating the same repetitive movements they see in sport in their practices, or they will overload those pathways, and performance will subsequently decrease.  We’ll tackle what to do about building speed in the midst of heavy sport practice in the next point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOT DOING STRENGTH TRAINING

Many beginner and intermediate athletes are not slow because they don’t sprint enough.  They are slow because they are unable to produce large amounts of force!  Since young athletes are constantly running, jumping, and playing, there is a good chance that they don’t have too many issues with expressing the force their muscles are able to produce.  What is more pressing for these athletes may simply be the ability of their muscles to produce large amounts of force in a coordinated manner.  A well-designed barbell program helps athletes to coordinate the firing of their large muscle groups together more efficiently, as well as allowing each muscle to learn more efficient and effective force patterns.  Over time, it helps the athlete add muscle mass to the prime movers of speed, but this must be done in a carefully planned pattern to help eliminate the compensation patterns that are so often present in advanced athletes who began heavy barbell training too early and in excess volume.

Strength programs often have immediate, significant effects on the speed of developing athletes due to the “nitrous boost” of muscular coordination they offer on multiple levels.  This is why the effect is often much more dramatic on a younger athlete compared to a developed athlete who already has good levels of coordination and skill in his or her body.

DOING TOO MUCH STRENGTH TRAINING

Although strength training can create a breakthrough for many athletes in speed development, doing too much of it forms an early plateau for those on the road to maximal velocity.  The reason why is that excessive volumes of strength training do a few things that are detrimental to speed:

  • Take adaptation reserves away from building speed and shift them to strength and stability in common strength training positions (such as the bottom of a squat, or the start of a deadlift). This is a more common problem for athletes who specialize in speed (such as track athletes) than it is for team sport athletes, who need to be more well-rounded and have joint stability in a variety of positions that they might see in the course of their competition.
  • Prolonged strength training done in large volumes will gradually build muscles that are responsible for compensation patterns in sprinting.  For example, the spinal erectors and hamstrings are synergists to the glute in sprinting.  They help with the movement of hip extension in a sprint, but shouldn’t be the main contributors.  Doing lots of squats, cleans, and deadlifts will gradually start to shift muscular development toward that of the spinal erectors and hamstrings over the glutes.  Give a CrossFit athlete a glute driven hip extension test, and you’ll usually find that their hamstrings and spinal erectors pop up to drive the movement well before the glute.  These high-volume lifting situations lend athletes toward relying on their glutes less (glutes as a driver of hip extension are key to speed) and on accessory muscles (spinal erectors pairing with hamstrings) more.
  • Excessive bilateral strength work can shift athletes into a level of anterior pelvic tilt that can hurt things like top-end velocity and sprint posture.

Most athletes are certainly not in danger of too much strength work in their speed development, but the gym rat who thinks that achieving a particular squat weight will be the key to running faster is heading down the wrong path.  Always put speed work above strength to become the fastest you can ultimately be.  This isn’t to say that pockets of heavy strength training aren’t useful for many athletes, because they are, but the ultimate road of training must be a specific one.

DOING TOO MUCH OF THE WRONG STRENGTH TRAINING

Strength training is important, but doing the right strength training might even be more important for speed development.  A good speed program is going to help an athlete combat weaknesses, while nurturing strengths.  Athletes who have poor starting speed off of the line of play will tend to achieve great gains through pistol squats and front squat variations.  Athletes who have trouble hitting that second gear immediately after the start (10-20m speed) will do well to work on their explosive strength, which can be developed through force oriented plyometric work, such as depth jumps and standing jumps for distance.  Explosive barbell lifts such as cleans and snatches are also helpful for developing the explosive aspect of this second gear speed.  Athletes who struggle with top-end speed will do well to maximize the strength and power of their posterior chain, so hip thrusts, single leg 45-degree back extensions, split squats (particularly oscillating and reactive versions), and single leg deadlifts are a nice remedy in this situation.  Specific isometrics and activation protocols are also solid gold for athletes who can accelerate well, but struggle past 20-30m to keep up with their peers.

Common mistakes include overuse of bilateral deep squats and full-catch Olympic lifts for an athlete lacking top end speed, or the overuse of plyometrics or posterior chain work for an athlete that can’t get off the line of scrimmage or the starting blocks well in those first few steps.  Much of the exact route of developing speed is going to depend on exactly what the athlete’s particular goal is.  Team sport athletes should seek to be more well-rounded than their track and field counterparts when it comes to various aspects of the speed equation, as they must be masters of the 0-20m speed realm, compared to a track athlete who must not specialize in those arenas of training that cater more toward acceleration than top end speed.  Not all training methods are created equally.

Generally speaking, once an athlete has been strength training for a few years, less is generally more in the weightroom when it comes to speed-seeking programs.    

 

 

 


Do Not Be Afraid To Be Great!

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OL – MB RNT, MB power, pass protect, run block, resisted power endurance, footwork/lateral agility, hand drills
DL – MB RNT, MB power, pass rush, resisted power endurance, lateral/circular speed, hand drills
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At the core of every player in every game in every sport is an athlete. At SPARQ, we believe that if you train to be a better athlete, you will excel in whatever sport you choose to play. So if you play tennis or volleyball, if you're a wrestler or a hockey player, this rating will tell you what need to know about your overall athleticism.

The SPARQ Athletic Assessment is a fantastic tool to help you decipher what you need to do to improve yourself, the Athlete, so you can dominate your competition, no matter what sport you play.
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Latest News


NLA End of Summer Programming
Jul 28, 2015, 1:46 pm
 

 Welcome
 To NLA Total Fitness!
 
This Department of Next Level Athletics is run by Tarsha Jackson, a former four sport Katy Tiger and graduate of U of H.
 
Her staff includes some of the BEST FITNESS TRAINERS In The Greater Houston Area.
 
Adam Meadows - NASM CES, PES, FMS, EXOS PES
Ro Quintero - NAMS CES, PES
Michael McCaskin - NASM CES, PES
Anthony Grimes - NASM PT
Chad Kornegay - NAMS PT
Brisled Quintero - PTA Global
Jonathon Uribe - NSCA CSCS
Jacob Phillips - NLA Athletic Director NSCA CSCS
 
We offer 3 phases of fitness for all levels.
Phase I Fitness - Intermediate
Phase II The NLA BOX - Advanced
Phase III Functional Patterns - Elite
 
ONLY $160 per month for all phases of TOTAL ADULT FITNESS
 
 
NLA Total Fitness Training: Elements of a well-rounded routine
 

Fitness training balances five elements of good health. Make sure your routine includes aerobic fitness, strength training, core exercises, balance training, flexibility and stretching

 

Whether you're a novice taking the first steps toward fitness or an exercise fanatic hoping to optimize your results, a well-rounded fitness training program is essential. Include these five elements to create a balanced routine.

 

Aerobic fitness

 

Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio or endurance activity, is the cornerstone of most fitness training programs. Aerobic exercise causes you to breathe faster and more deeply, which maximizes the amount of oxygen in your blood.

Strength training

 

Muscular fitness is another key component of a fitness training program. Strength training at least twice a week can help you increase bone strength and muscular fitness. It can also help you maintain muscle mass during a weight-loss program.

 Core exercises

 

The muscles in your abdomen, lower back and pelvis — known as your core muscles — help protect your back and connect upper and lower body movements. Core strength is a key element of a well-rounded fitness training program.

Balance training

 

Older adults in particular should include exercises to maintain or improve balance in their routine exercises. This is important because balance tends to deteriorate with age, which can lead to falls and fractures. However, anyone can benefit from balance training, as it can help stabilize your core muscles. Try standing on one leg for increasing periods of time to improve your overall stability.

 
Flexibility and stretching
 
 

Flexibility is an important part of physical fitness. Some types of physical activity, such as dancing, require more flexibility than others. Stretching exercises are effective in increasing flexibility, and thereby can allow people to more easily do activities that require greater flexibility. Stretching also improves the range of motion of your joints and promotes better posture. Regular stretching can even help relieve stress. For this reason, stretching and flexibility activities are an appropriate part of a physical activity program.

 

PHASE I

Total Fitness

 

 
 
 

Our adult fitness program is booming! We started out training parents while their children trained simultaneously and now we have people training whether their kids are there or not.

FOR ONE LOW PRICE you can progress through PHASE I, II & III TOTAL FITNESS TRAINING! 

 

 

Sign Up NOW!

Phase I Total Fitness

 

With NLA you will never get bored or feel like you are doing the same thing over and over. With our Phase I , II & III progression you will find yourself always challenged, always improving, ALWAYS BETTER!

 

Everyone is getting hooked on the best value in the greater Houston and Katy area. Don't spend one more second sitting in our facility waiting for your child to finish their workout while you are bored out of your skull. Jump in and get in on the action!

 

 

Phase II 
TOTAL FITNESS
 
 

 


 
The NLA Box Program is our Advanced Adult Fitness Program where all fitness enthusiasts will find themselves active in FITNESS-PERFORMANCE WODs as well as Simple & Sinister Kettle Bell Training to name a few.
 
SIGN UP NOW!
 
 
NO MORE RUSHING TO A CLASS TIME OR MISSING A WORKOUT! Our ALL DAY TRAINING makes it easy for a Fitness Beginner all the way to a Fitness Elite to GET IT IN.
 
PHASE III
TOTAL FITNESS
 
You do not have to be an athlete to train like athlete to be one. 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Welcome To FUNCTIONAL PATTERN TRAINING, our ELITE Fitness Program. Total body and core barbell program, pendulum squats, contralateral core training, unilateral plyometrics, Indian Club program to name a few.

 

We offer Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, Level 4 & Level 5 FUNCTIONAL PATTERN TRAINING.

 

This program is the foundation of our FUNCTIONAL STRENGTH Training.

 

REGISTER NOW!

TOTAL FITNESS PHASE III

 

 

TEACHING THE MUSCLES HOW TO WORK TOGETHER!

 

This is our Advanced Adult Fitness Program, if you a cross fitter or boot camp athlete you will enjoy thoroughly enjoy these sessions. You will find yourself using Indian clubs, mace, roped med ball in ways you never imagined.

 

This is by far the most exciting and newest fitness training available to the public.

 

NLA Headquarters:

 

Our BRAND NEW 15,000 Sq Ft Sports/Fitness Complex located at 25311 Kingsland Blvd Ste 120 Katy Texas 77494 near Katy Mills Mall is 60% done. This has been 15 years in the making so it taking so long has been trying but WE ARE ALMOST DONE!

 

We are very proud to bring to the Katy Community a STATE OF THE ART Facility where the ENTIRE FAMILY can enjoy safe, challenging and effective training.

 

          

 

 

GRAND OPENING DATE VERY SOON!


 Are you prepared for your best season yet?
 Next Level Athletics.
21414 Julie Marie Ln Ste 1001
832-272-0827
832-437-9629
coachrey@nlainc.org
nlasportstraining.com